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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
plan. >> excellence. >> well executed. >> i thank you. >> a lot of criticism of fema back in katrina. today we hear nothing but good about fema. >> i thank craig would lives and breathes this stuff. >>neil: not so fast because all in rescueville is not so great. a lot of the folks they represent would like to kick them in the ass. this is the reality. welcome, everyone, not so happy friday. mr. president, you may want to wait on the "heck of a job" thing because rescue efforts have become heck of a joke for folks in the northeast fuming. because the help isn't coming. in gas. no power. no food. they have had it. >> restaurants and boats and homes are looted. >> the coast guard has not been here to help. >> come here and walk into the streets here. the water is this high. you have to wear the waders. >>neil: that is just on staten island. homes are swamps. motorists are stuck if -- in gas lines, four hours or more if you can find a place to fill in. two-thirds of gas stations even now in new york and new jersey remain shut down. out of juice. out of gas. thousands are fuming, out of p
there is no drinking water. >> neil: you and i sxi can remember with katrina, big difference in variety of levels. it was the same immediate response that things were under control. the famous heck of a job brownie comment that prompted the initial view, things are under control and not so bad. then we started getting the images, we started seeing more and more. it was not under control. we're seeing the initial response on the part of president and governor christie and mayor bloomberg and governor of new jersey is still speaking to reporters in hoboken. residents who are affected in these areas, you are talking a good game but it ain't happening to me. that is when it turns the tide. what do you see happening now if this lingers much longer? >> reporter: first of all, thank you for covering this story. i have been watching other stations, they are not covering this station. a lot of americans saw the instant response, this was a storm that was dealt with and very professional and competent manner and fema and state. now, we are finding out thanks in large part that is not the case. i think a lo
this before, during katrina, even with your protest, with president public we have problems do not get cocky, we have a handle on it, i am getting the same sense with this storm. i don't think anything approaching the magnitude of katrina thank good but the treatment of officials and the way they back slap each other when the problem is still very much at hand, that is similar. what do you thick of that? >>guest: that is similar and it is absolutely wrong. what i see based on my experience there must be a lost miscommunication going on between state, local, and federal officials. if that is the case and let me tell you why i think it is the case, if you have food distribution, warming centers, and fema centers where you can fine up for the relief housed in the same place, and family shuts that down and no one is communicating that to the victims and the disaster area someone is not communicating with someone and that is serious. >>neil: thank you for your insight, michael. the stuff gets coordinated and sometimes botched when everyone is not on the same page. michael brown was warning about
to try this. lis? >>lis: i think so. it happened with katrina in 2005. victims sued fema and actually won. you can sue for gross negligence. it is a contract. here is what i argue to this gentleman on the screen and other people there. as a woman who had literary her roof blown off i am not unbiased on this. you have a contract with fema. we all do, to take kay of discuss protect us if a hall disaster like this. if they do not come through, which they have not in a month for many people as we have seen you can sue for breach of contract, gross negligence. >> two words: sovereign immunity you cannot sue a federal government or the agencies unless they give up a waiver. there is an exception of the gross negligence and willful conduct but that is not what he was saying, they have 475,000 people to need. for us be able to manage the catastrophe, the storm of a century, it is impossible for us to get there and give them the help they need under the immediate circumstances. >>lis: we are talking a month. >>guest: right now we have to do a look and see. >>lis: look and see? look and see? >>gue
of criticism of fema in katrina days and today you hear nothing but good things about fema. >> i thank craig fugate who lives and breathes this stuff. >>neil: for many, the rescue efforts have become heck of a joke with folks in the northeast fuming because the help isn't coming. though they are trying. no gas. no food. no power. >> homes being looted. >> the coast guard is not here to help. or the federal government. or the city. >> walk in the streets here, the water is this high. i am wearing waders. >> i don't know what the people are doing patting themselves on their back. i got people on staten island and new jersey and long island, my son lost his house, people are living with no houses over their head, people on staten island crying their eyes out and they don't have water. just be real. these people need help. >> many on staten island say it is the forgotten borough. >> fed up. fed up. this line, that line, what are we in is this america? >> fema just arrived. >> don't have anything anywhere to go. no clothes. >> people still hurting. they still looking for people. >>neil: a lot of
the superstorm sandy and during katrina. when american people are asked to innovate, to conserve and car pool. >> and asked to wait in line forever and i don't know that superstorm sandy is the best example. >> one of the things that we have to think about conservation and implications and pollution and things like that. and might force that, but kevin, a lot of people don't have a choice, they have to drive. >> you know, brenda, you can't take blood from a stone. we have inflation in food, in energy and heating oil and the gasoline and everything else and everything consumer goods that we see. it's going to impact discretionary spending. and they are he going to do it willingly and we're all trying it save money, but at the end of the day it's another tax on the middle class, all this is and already, if you look, again, i've lived in eastern europe, too, and pay more for gas, but people cannot spend as much on other things, bottom line it's a tax on the middle class, it's going to affect the economy for the worse, that's it. >> final word. >> challenging things to put in front of the americ
to do with hurricane katrina. >>neil: the wind at their back, comments from new york governor cuomo, this is indisputable proof of dangers of community change and what happens, so, when they use american politicians to make their point, is it the next step to get more american money to rectify this point? >>guest: what they trying to do and president obama said this in his convention speech, he said it if americans can something about floods, hurricanes, droughts tornado as though the ballot box you can vote yourself better weather. or, second, they are implying we can legislate better weather much the mayor in new york said we need to take immediate action not to shore up shorelines, but to try to prevent bad weather in the future despite the impact that low co0 -- co2 hungs -- hurricanes remain much worse but the idea of a carbon tax is being floated and the idea of regulations and climate measures we could take are going to impact our weather, this is now reaching a level of the mayan calendar for science. "new york times" is calling, has a picture of the statue of liberty underw
. katrina, what are they doing? >>guest: well, they are actually looking at potentially cutting the mortgage deduction. now, if my opinion this is another example of president obama and congress trying to take money away from people's pockets in order to fund government spending when if reality the revenue that would be brought in by cutting away the mortgage deduction wouldn't make a dent in reducing the national deficit. in fact, the approximate savings for cutting the mortgage deduction would be about $83 billion and that would only help run the government for 8.3 days and would have reduced the national deficit not one bit. >>neil: if you, a lot of people buy a home or second home with the idea they have the write off to enjoy, the mortgage deduction, there is a $1 million cap on underlying mortgage for principle interest but if they go after that, what do you see happening? >>guest: well, as the real estate market is going to do well and warren buffett said it is spark the economy and the government will interfere with that? many willing a this is only going to affect the rich, the peop
and then we will see like katrina, we will see the stories trickle in. we saw it seven years ago where a month from now, two months from now, we will see some of the scams, people taking advantage of the system, and that is the tragedy, a lot of money is going to be wasted and not go to the proper people and the proper resources. >>neil: we will watch it closely. in the meantime, it is his party, and he will invite who he wants and if you are a victorious president obama you will not invite who you do not want to. meet the guy who found out the hard way he can't come to the white house. and get this, he is just across the street from the white house. i talk a lot about one reverse mortgage. i thought this is the greatest way to explain it to people. what happened when you made that call? first of all, we had to clarify immediately that the house would be mine. what did the one reverse mortgage then do for you? well i can meet the expenses at the end of the month with no anxiety. trust me, it worked for me! [ henry ] call now and you'll find out that you can turn the equity from your home into
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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